Tag Archives: 1935

RIP Gary Peacock (1935 – 2020)

Gary Peacock was an American jazz double-bassist. He recorded a dozen albums under his own name, and also performed and recorded with major jazz figures such as Albert Ayler, Paul Bley, Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett and Tony Williams.

Life Time (1964) by Tony Williams

On Life Time (Blue Note, 1964), Gary Peacock plays bass on tracks one to three.

RIP Zeev Sternhell (1935 – 2020)

The Birth of Fascist Ideology (1989)

Zeev Sternhell was an Israeli scholar known for his study of fascism, The Birth of Fascist Ideology (1989).

I headed for the university library and found that book.

I read the introduction and the rest of the book ‘by index’.

Doing that, I stumbled upon the grand sweeping statements by T. E. Hulme on his hatred for the Renaissance, Rousseau and Romanticism:

“That is why he [Hulme] was so hostile to romanticism: underlying romanticism and the French Revolution, he believed, was the Rousseauist concept of the individual. Rousseau, he wrote, taught the people of the eighteenth century “that man was by nature good,” that he was “an infinite reservoir of possibilities,” and that the source of all evils was “bad laws.” According to Rousseau, the destruction of the existing oppressive order would open up infinite possibilities of progress. Classicism, wrote Hulme, was defined by an opposite conception, namely, that “man is an extraordinarily fixed and limited animal whose nature is absolutely constant. It is only by tradition and organization that anything decent can be got out of him.””

The citations are from T. E. Hulme’s Speculations (1936).

It is interesting to note that Sternhell locates the origins of fascism within the artistic realm:

“A desire to cleanse the world of the defilements of the eighteenth century and to introduce various forms of discipline such as classicism and nationalism, no less than a rejection of liberal and bourgeois “decadence,” united in a single tide of sentiment some of the most important literary and artistic avant-gardes in Europe.”

RIP Maj Sjöwall (1935 – 2020)

Maj Sjöwall was a Swedish author known as the co-author of the ten Martin Beck (1965-1975) novels.

She was with her partner Per Wahlöö (1926 – 1975) the spiritual co-parent of Nordic noir.

In my universe she is important for having been published in the  Zwarte Beertjes collection of pocket books.

To an international audience she is all but forgotten.

I believe all of the duo’s books were made into films.

I give you the trailer of The Laughing Policeman (1973) featuring Walter Matthau and Bruce Dern.

RIP Henry Grimes and Giuseppi Logan (1935 – 2020)

Sonny’s Time Now (1965) on which Grimes played bass. That record is in the Top Ten Free Jazz Underground (1995) list.

Henry Grimes was an American jazz musician working in the free jazz idiom.

Giuseppi Logan American jazz musician working in the free jazz idiom.

Also, both were tortured artists.

Giuseppi Logan Quartet (1965, ESP-Disk-1007)

I’ve always had a fascination with free jazz which veers from awe to disbelief to a mild form of even scorn.

It’s as if free jazz is the locus of strife between my need for entertainment and intellectualism.

This love–hate relationship appears to be my variety of the wild orchids and Trotsky.

But jazz itself was also that locus of strife.

Because it was somewhere in the 1940s that jazz begot bebop, and the road that had been jazz permanently forked.

One side continued its entertainment course.

Another side explored the realm of high art.

So as jazz became less popular, it became more highbrow.

Behind the scenes, rock and roll and R&B had been waiting impatiently to fill this entertainment void.

RIP Sergio Rossi (1935 – 2020)

Sergio Rossi was an Italian shoe designer.

I discovered his work by finding a page dedicated to misogynistic advertising.

Here is the image I discovered, white stockings, white shoes, only the legs are visible, in a Mondriaan-like framework.[1]

Disembodied legs as depicted in this Rossi advertisement haven an aphrodisiac effect on me.

RIP Latsploitation queen Isabel Sarli (1935 – 2019)

Isabel Sarli was an Argentinian model and actress known for her risqué films. As such, she was the Latin American Brigitte Bardot. The first film to show her nude was Thunder Among the Leaves (1957) which has her skinny-dipping from 50:09 to 51:38. There are also nude indigenous females (26:34 and subsequent scenes).

Thunder Among the Leaves (1958)

If you are more into the wackier films like I am, there is Carne (1968) with Isabel Sarli as Delicia, a worker in a meat-packing factory; Fuego (1969) with Sarli as a nymphomaniac; and Fiebre (1970) in which Sarli falls in love with a horse when she sees a stallion mounting a mare.

Carne (1968)

Fuego (1969)

Fiebre (1970)

Searching for “Isabel Sarli”, “sexploitation” and “Latsploitation” brings up snippets such as “generally boring sexploitation film about one of those favorite characters in male reveries, a nymphomaniac.” ([on Fuego] in Cue – Volume 40, Issues 1-13 – Page 67 (1971)); “Isabel Sarli breasting her way through further south-of-the-border sexploitation affairs. […] There’s never been a nudie movie queen more amply endowed than Argentina’s Isabel Sarli who simply has to shed her clothing to make things like story and characterization seem irrelevant.” (Film Bulletin – Volume 39 (1970)); “Woman and Temptation is zero as art, but the talents of the buxom Isabel Sarli make this a top sexploiter entry.” (Filmfacts – Volume 12 (1969)) and “While we cannot claim that Sarli’s films would adhere to a feminist agenda …” (Latsploitation, Exploitation Cinemas, and Latin America (2009)).