Tag Archives: French cinema

RIP Jean-Paul Belmondo (1933 – 2021)


Jean-Paul Belmondo was a French actor known for his boxer’s nose and rubbery lips.

Breathless (1960)

He is famous for breaking the fourth wall in the nouvelle vague film Breathless (1960); for his stunts and bravado in That Man from Rio (1964); and for painting his face blue in Pierrot le Fou (1965).

Pierrot le Fou (1965)

In the beginning of his career, he played in both art films and commercial films, later on he only followed the money and the popularity, flat out saying:

“I really prefer making adventure movies like Rio to the intellectual movies of Alain Resnais or Alain Robbe-Grillet.”–Jean-Paul Belmondo, The New York Times, 1964

RIP Françoise Arnoul (1931 – 2021)

 Post Coitum, Animal Triste (1997)

Françoise Arnoul was a French actress known for her parts in French CancanThe Devil and the Ten Commandments and Forbidden Fruit; and not so much for her part in Post Coitum, Animal Triste (1997). However, I show you the trailer of that film, because of its title, which I have been able to trace into the 16th century, in the work of Jean Benedict in La somme des péchés et le remède d’iceux (1595).

RIP Pierre Jansen (1930 – 2015)

 Acera, or the Witches’ Dance (1972) by Jean Painlevé

This happened in 2015, but I only found out today.

Pierre Jansen was a French composer working in film. He was in particular the permanent collaborator of Claude Chabrol for whom he composed the music for many films.

He also scored the above documentary Acera, or the Witches’ Dance (1972) by Jean Painlevé.

RIP Jean-Claude Romer (1933 – 2021)

Jean-Claude Romer was a French actor, film critic and film historian.

Midi Minuit Fantastique (1962 – 1971)

He was editor-in-chief of French film magazine Midi Minuit Fantastique (1962 – 1971), the first magazine dedicated to genre cinema and cinema fantastique.

It has come to my attention that the first issue of Midi Minuit Fantastique is online in full at Archive.org[1].

That issue is dedicated to Terence Fisher, who still seems to be a bit underrated and of whose film The Stranglers of Bombay it is said:

“More clearly than any other Hammer effort, The Stranglers of Bombay lays bare the foundation of voyeurism, scopophilia, misogyny, castration anxiety, repression, sadomasochism, and “the male gaze” which informs the construction of Hammer’s output.”

The Charm of Evil: The Life and Films of Terence Fisher (1991) by Wheeler W. Dixon

One thing leading to another as they say, I stop here, because it is leading me too far.

RIP Jean-Claude Carrière (1931 – 2021)

The Phantom of Liberty, the toilet scene

Jean-Claude Carrière was a French novelist and screenwriter famous for scripting The Discreet Charm of the BourgeoisieThe Phantom of Liberty and The Unbearable Lightness of Being.

I give you the toilet scene from The Phantom of Liberty, it makes you wonder if Buñuel scripted it alone or he asked Carrièret to assist him.

RIP François Leterrier (1929 – 2020)

François Leterrier was a French film director and actor. He entered the film industry when he was cast in Robert Bresson’s film A Man Escaped (1956).

Slices of Life (1985), full film
Goodbye Emmanuelle (1977), side one of the album

Goodbye Emmanuelle (1977) features a reggae-inspired soundtrack by Serge Gainsbourg.

Paris sera toujours Paris” segment from  Slices of Life (1985)

His sketch film Slices of Life (1985) is a bit silly but features the prescient and good-hearted “Paris sera toujours Paris” which is an illustration of the Great Replacement theory.

RIP Michel Robin (1930 – 2020)

In France, the actor Michel Robin died. He turned 90. He played in more than 120 films. Always bit parts. You can recognize him by his bald head and the banal characters he usually had to portray.

Mais ne nous délivrez pas du mal (1971)

Favorites are Mais ne nous délivrez pas du mal (1971), a film about two beautiful adolescent girls who start indulging in a satanic love for evil. Robin plays the simple gardener whose parakeet is killed by the diabolic duo.

There is L’Invitation (1973) in which Robin plays a simple and clumsy office worker who, after inheriting a fortune, invites his colleagues to his new estate. There, those good bourgeois men and women are intoxicated by a spiked drink at the hands of a rogue bartender. The situation escalates. Cult movie.

 Marquis (1989)

And then there is the genius animal head puppet film Marquis (1989) in which Robin voices a certain Ambert, a rat prison guard who is eager to be sodomized by the Marquis de Sade, something Colin, the living and talking phallus of the Marquis does not wish to indulge in.