Tag Archives: jazz

RIP Gary Peacock (1935 – 2020)

Gary Peacock was an American jazz double-bassist. He recorded a dozen albums under his own name, and also performed and recorded with major jazz figures such as Albert Ayler, Paul Bley, Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett and Tony Williams.

Life Time (1964) by Tony Williams

On Life Time (Blue Note, 1964), Gary Peacock plays bass on tracks one to three.

RIP Hal Singer (1919-2020)

Hal Singer  was an American R&B and jazz bandleader and saxophonist. He was the last surviving male survivor of the Tulsa race massacre.

“Malcolm X”

He is known for such instrumentals as “Malcolm X” on the album Paris Soul Food (1969), produced by Bernard Estardy.

If you are a melomaniac, I’d check the latter’s “Ombilic Contact” en “Cha Tatch Ka”.

RIP Salome Bey (1939 – 2020)

Salome Bey was an American-born Canadian composer and singer.

She did solo work but in my book she is famous for having part in an unforgettable version of “Round Midnight” (1944) with the unforgettable lines

“But it really gets bad,
’round midnight.”

She did that version with her brother Andy and her sister Geraldine, both of whom survive her.

RIP Henry Grimes and Giuseppi Logan (1935 – 2020)

Sonny’s Time Now (1965) on which Grimes played bass. That record is in the Top Ten Free Jazz Underground (1995) list.

Henry Grimes was an American jazz musician working in the free jazz idiom.

Giuseppi Logan American jazz musician working in the free jazz idiom.

Also, both were tortured artists.

Giuseppi Logan Quartet (1965, ESP-Disk-1007)

I’ve always had a fascination with free jazz which veers from awe to disbelief to a mild form of even scorn.

It’s as if free jazz is the locus of strife between my need for entertainment and intellectualism.

This love–hate relationship appears to be my variety of the wild orchids and Trotsky.

But jazz itself was also that locus of strife.

Because it was somewhere in the 1940s that jazz begot bebop, and the road that had been jazz permanently forked.

One side continued its entertainment course.

Another side explored the realm of high art.

So as jazz became less popular, it became more highbrow.

Behind the scenes, rock and roll and R&B had been waiting impatiently to fill this entertainment void.

RIP Onaje Allan Gumbs (1949 – 2020)

Onaje Allan Gumbs was an American pianist, best-known for having played with the fine fleur of American jazz.

 Genesis (1974)


As I prefer all roads to lead to Rome, and Rome is my book, the death of Onaje Allan Gumbs must inevitably lead to Strata-East Records, more specifically to Charles Sullivan’s album Genesis (1974) on which mister Gumbs played piano.