Tag Archives: 1942

RIP Larry Flynt (1942 – 2021)

Larry Flynt was the publisher of American pornographic magazine Hustler, founded in 1974 in the slipstream of the sexual revolution.

I show you an interview from 2014.

In the opening splash you see — at the right hand side — the controversial cover of a woman who is fed to a meat grinder.

Flynt was a rebel. Many pornographers were. That’s what used to make pornography so interesting during the early modern period up until the sexual revolution.

RIP Jerry Jeff “Mr. Bojangles“ Walker (1942 – 2020)

Jerry Jeff Walker was an American musician best known for writing “Mr. Bojangles“.

Walker recorded “Mr. Bojangles” too, but when I hear that song I’m invariably only reminded of the heavily orchestrated version by the great Nina Simone.

The Nina Simone version wormed itself into my head in 2006 via the compilation Nova Classics 07 released on Radio Nova, keepers of musical taste in the early 2000s.

Nina first released on her cover album Here Comes the Sun from 1971.

Mr. Bojangles

RIP Shere Hite (1942 – 2020)

Shere Hite (1942 – 2020) was a American-born German sex educator and feminist. Her sexological work focused primarily on female sexuality.

She is best-known for her book The Hite Report on Female Sexuality (1976) which is in several ways a successor to Masters and Johnson’s Human Sexual Response (1966) and Kinsey’s Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953).

In this book, she permanently devaluated the coitus in favour of more attention for the clitoris.

She is the last great feminist. Perhaps only equalled by Camille Paglia (born 1947). Nancy Friday (1933 – 2017) is another famous feminist of that generation.

RIP Toots ‘Maytal’ Hibbert (1942 – 2020)

“Funky Kingston” (1972)

Toots Hibbert was a Jamaican singer and songwriter, leader for the band Toots & the Maytals. He is best-known for such songs as “54-46 That’s My Number” (1968), “Pressure Drop” (1970) and “Funky Kingston” (1972).

Hibbert was one of the first artists to use the word “reggae” in 1968’s “Do the Reggay”.

RIP Irm Hermann (1942 – 2020)

Irm Hermann was a German actress best known for her films with Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

In Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974), she is the girlfriend of racist Eugen (Fassbinder).

Things come to a crisis when her mother (Brigitte Mira) falls in love with a Moroccan Gastarbeiter (migrant worker).

Researching this death, I came across an interview with a very lovable Brigitte Mira and her relationship to director Fassbinder.

RIP Hamilton Bohannon (1942 – 2020)

Hamilton Bohannon  was an American musician best known for the disco hit “Let’s Start the Dance” (1978).

“Me and the Gang” (1978, the basis for “Get Get Down”, 1999, Paul Johnson)

Other compositions of note include “I Remember” (1981, the basis for “From: Disco To: Disco”, 1996), “Me and the Gang” (1978, the basis for “Get Get Down”, 1999), “Truck Stop” (1974), “South African Man” (1975) and “The Beat (Part 2)” (1979).

His instrumentals have a mesmerizing repetitiveness and a lack of violins which went down well with the people who liked to dance but were not into the kitsch of disco.

RIP Terry ‘monty python’ Jones (1942 – 2020)

“He’s not the messiah, but a very naughty boy.”

Terry Jones will be best-remembered for playing Maria in Life of Brian (1979) in which she proclaims indignantly that her son is “not the messiah, but a very naughty boy.”

Every death being an encounter, I was surprised to learn that Jones was also a popular historian.

In ‘The Knight’ episode of Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives (2004) Jones explains how the English word knight stems from the Germanic word knecht, two words which have since then have become to denote opposite things. In Dutch, the ‘knecht’ (also the name for a farmhand now) is the one who helps the knight, a page boy really.