Tag Archives: 1947

RIP Guem (1947 – 2021)

Guem was an Algerian musician, composer and dancer.

Guem is best known for his cult dancefloor recording “Le Serpent” (1978).

Le Serpent” (1978)

“Le Serpent” is a sibling to “Jingo” (1959) by Candido Camero, “New Bell” (1972) by Manu Dibango and “Road Close” (1984) by Tony Allen, who all died last year.

RIP J. J. Lionel (1947 – 2020)

La danse des canards” (1981)

J. J. Lionel was a Belgian musician whose song “La danse des canards” (1981) is one of the best-selling singles ever in France.

There is popular music and and then there is “danse des canards” popular, almost as popular as “Hava Nagila”.  

Both are songs everyone knows but no one can remember where it originates.

RIP Keith Tippett (1947 – 2020)

Keith Tippett was a British jazz pianist and composer who appeared and recorded in many settings, including a duet with Stan Tracey, duets with his wife Julie Driscoll), solo performances, and as a bandleader, and appeared on three King Crimson albums.

 You Are Here… I Am There (1970)

YouTube has the full album of You Are Here… I Am There (1970)

RIP Florian ‘Kraftwerk’ Schneider (1947 – 2020)

Florian Schneider was a German musician, known for his work with Kraftwerk.

Of interest in my book is the connection of Kraftwerk to Afro-American music as noted in “Planet Rock”.

Jon Savage noted in his piece “Machine Soul: A History Of Techno” (1993) that:

“In 1981, Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force, together with producer Arthur Baker, paid tribute [to Kraftwerk with] “Planet Rock,” which used the melody from “Trans-Europe Express” over the rhythm from “Numbers.” In the process they created electro and moved rap out of the Sugarhill age.”

Simon Reynolds in Energy Flash (1998) similarly remarked:

“In New York, the German band almost single-handedly sired the electro movement: Afrika Bambaataa and Soulsonic Force’s 1982 smash “Planet Rock” stole its doomy melody from “Trans-Europe Express” and its beatbox rhythm from Kraftwerk’s 1981 track “Numbers.””–Generation Ecstasy (1998) by Simon Reynolds

Apparently, none of Kraftwerk’s material was actually sampled, all was emulated.

RIP Millie “My Boy Lollipop” Small (1947 – 2020)

Millie Small was the singer of “My Boy Lollipop” (1964), her only hit.

She was the first Jamaican artist to break through to an international audience.

Did this mean international recognition for ska and reggae?

Well, not exactly, “My Boy Lollipop” was considered a novelty song rather than ska or reggae.

Thus reggae’s invasion into the mainstream actually only began that same year in the United Kingdom with songs such as “Al Capone” (1964) and “Guns of Navarone” (1964).

But in the United States, the wait was for 1969 with “The Israelites” (1968) to give reggae international repute and recognition.